rmccampbell

Rachael McCampbell

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Rachael McCampbell
About the author

Artist’s Bio by Rachael McCampbell February, 2011 I enjoy working in series, that is, coming up with an idea for a body of paintings and exploring that concept until I feel that I have learned something new about the subject matter, the process and myself. I did a show on endangered species of North America in 2009, for example, with a large installation about extinction in the middle of the gallery with paintings of endangered species surrounding it. This show benefited "The Land Trust for Tennessee." The central painting for the show about Whooping Cranes called, “Dreams of Bells Bend,” sold to the Tennessee State Museum last year for their permanent collection. In 2010, I did an exhibit on Greek Mythology focusing on the women in these classic tales entitled, "Women in Mythology: the Power of the Feminine in Ancient Tales." That show ran at the Parthenon Museum in Nashville, Tennessee for four months. But, in general, my subject matter draws heavily from nature, as I like to paint mainly horses and birds either in repose or in motion on large canvases. I also paint from models and do abstracted figurative work as well. I paint on canvas and panel in both acrylics and oils. I layer my work and build up a great deal of texture. My interest in drawing also plays into my paintings. As I like to show the "artist's hand," I often work backwards, drawing on top of a finished painting and exposing the line work that provided the painting's original armature. Having grown up on a farm in Tennessee, I have always been inspired by wildlife and the lessons flora and fauna can teach us. After years of living in New York, Europe and Los Angeles, I moved back to Tennessee three years ago where I can observe and explore firsthand the landscapes, animals and birds that inform my work. I earned my B.F.A. at the University of Georgia then right after graduation moved to Florence, Italy where I worked for fashion designer Emilio Pucci. Then I lived in New York and furthered my education at Parsons while working in art galleries in SoHo. I then attended a year-long program at Christie’s Fine Art Course in London where I graduated with honors. In Los Angeles, I supported myself as a commercial artist until my fine art career could support me. My years of being a commercial artist taught me to be a disciplined artist, to meet deadlines and to work easily with committees, creating artwork that pleased everyone involved. This background has helped me a great deal in completing exhibits on time, marketing my work, and finishing commissions from the sketch phase to the final product that clients are happy with. I’ve been in many shows and my work is collected both nationally and internationally. I teach art to private clientelle.